State of Florida Seeking Additional General Contractors to Rebuild Thousands of Homes Still Damaged by Hurricane Irma

State of Florida Seeking Additional General Contractors to Rebuild Thousands of Homes Still Damaged by Hurricane Irma

In support of the state of Florida’s goal to help Floridians recover from disasters, the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation is helping to spread the word that the state of Florida is seeking additional general contractors to support Rebuild Florida. Rebuild Florida is a program of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) created to help thousands of Floridians rebuild their homes that were damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Irma.

Since the program was launched by DEO in September of 2018, with federal funding to repair or replace homes damaged by Hurricane Irma, nearly 11,000 Floridians have registered for assistance. To meet the needs for Rebuild Florida assistance, DEO is asking Florida’s construction industry, specifically general contractors, to submit bids to partner with the Rebuild Florida program to repair and rebuild damaged homes.

DEO is looking to enter into contracts with qualified general contractors to perform all services necessary to repair, rebuild or replace homes. These services include, but are not limited to, the provisions of a general contractor’s oversite and supervision, and all labor, associated hardware, materials, required permits, drawings and equipment necessary to repair homes. Interested parties can learn more about the technical requirements and submit bids once the Invitation to Bid is released later this month. To submit a bid, you must first register with MyFloridaMarketPlace, the state of Florida’s online procurement system.

Rebuild Florida is a partnership of DEO and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which approved funding to local communities for Florida’s long-term recovery efforts after the 2017 hurricane season. Rebuild Florida will repair and rebuild damaged homes across the hardest-hit communities of our state, with priority funding for low-income families who are most vulnerable, including the elderly, those with disabilities and families with children under age 18.